Observaties

This is a good year for the Japanese-born architect Shigeru Ban. In June he was awarded the Pritzer Prize, and last week his new building for the Aspen Art Museum opened in Colorado.

The Pritzker Foundation chose the newly reopened Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam for this year’s Awards ceremony. The museum in Aspen has an airy façade on two side made of woven strips and a roof of wooden latticework that is reminiscent of one of Shigeru Ban’s best-known buildings: the satellite for Paris’ Centre Pompidou in the northern French city of Metz. Its roof is a feat of engineering, with undulating interwoven beams creating eight thousand square meters of wooden mesh. The architect says it was inspired by a woven Chinese hat he found in Paris. >>>

TU Delft transformeert de stad met 'city solo's '
2x Buitenveldert, 1x Lelylaan, 2x Sarphatistraat, 2x 'Soloterdijk'

Voor een stad is woningnood in zekere zin een teken van succes. Groot of klein, in de steden waar iedereen wil zijn ontstaat vanzelf een tekort aan woonruimte. New York, Londen, Amsterdam – ongeveer de helft van de huishoudens bestaat tegenwoordig uit één persoon, oftewel de city solo.

Volgens de TU Delft heeft Amsterdam voor deze doelgroep in 2040 nog eens 31.400 woningen nodig. De solo’s bestaan volgens hun onderzoek uit 16 procent studenten, 25 procent starters, 39 procent professionals en 20 procent senioren, De studenten en senioren hebben een voorkeur voor huren, de starters en professionals voor koop. Interessante factoid: de studenten geven relatief het meeste uit aan huisvesting, terwijl de starters en professionals het meest geld hebben.>>>

Stadsleven interview: internet critic Evgeny Morosov on the theft of our time and attention
Video by Daryl Mulvihill

For my monthly live talkshow in Amsterdam, Stadsleven ('City Life' ) I interviewed internet critic Evgeny Morosov, prolific essayist and author of 'To Save Everything, Click Here' (translated in Dutch by publisher De Wereld as 'Om de wereld te redden, klik hier'). The theme this month (May 2014) is 'Slow City', about how to reconquer calm and focus in hectic urban life, and I talked to Morosov about the virtues of boredom and the onslaught on our time and attention by addictive social media. Morosov admits that he is vulnerable too: he sometimes locks away his router cable and smartphone so as to have a chance to be creatively bored.

>>>
Stadsleven interview: <br>Saskia Sassen on smart cities and big data
Video Daryl Mulvihill

For my live monthly talkshow Stadsleven ('City Life') the theme in April 2014 was 'Big Data: What does the city know about me?'. One of my guests, via Skype and video, was the Columbia sociologist Saskia Sassen, well-known for her research on globalization and migration. "Much of the design of smart cities generates a city that is not smart enough," she says. "Actually they are pretty stupid." Too much standardized technology leads to a loss of local knowledge, says Sassen. "Ultimately you need openness."

>>>
Stadsleven interview with Saskia Sassen
Video Daryl Mulvihill

For my live monthly talkshow Stadsleven ('City Life') the theme in April 2014 was 'Big Data: What does the city know about me?'. One of my guests, via Skype and video, was the Columbia sociologist Saskia Sassen, well-known for her research on globalization and migration. "Much of the design of smart cities generates a city that is not smart enough," she says. "Actually they are pretty stupid." Too much standardized technology leads to a loss of local knowledge, says Sassen. "Ultimately you need openness."

>>>