Architectural Record: the canaries in the global warming-coalmine

Architectural Record: the canaries in the global warming-coalmine

The Dutch are the canaries in the global-warming coalmine, writes James Russell in his review of Sweet&Salt: Water and the Dutch in the December print issue of Architectural Record. ‘Sweet&Salt is a profoundly humanistic consideration of the culture of water, with many ideas by designers about how to deal with water’s myriad challenges.’ He describes the book as ”an intensely visual consideration of the history, culture and engineering of water that engages our senses and our emotions – not just our intellect – with its ravishing photography, cartography and art.” He is manifestly relieved that it is possible to talk about water issues and climate change without having to put on a hair shirt. 

Read the article…
Sweet&Salt:  Water Is Their Frenemy

Sweet&Salt: Water Is Their Frenemy

Sweeet&Salt: Water and the Dutch is ‘a beautiful and important book’, writes Armando Carbonell of the Lincoln Institute for Land Policy in his review of the book for the Loeb Fellowship site. ‘The ever-increasing Dutch reliance on engineering solutions to keep the water at bay does not come without costs, and they go beyond the never-ending building and maintenance of structures. There are increasing conflicts between the sweet and the salt, with serious worries about  fresh water for drinking and agriculture.’ And now comes the ‘hot breath of climate change’, with a higher sea level, bigger storm surges and more extreme rainfall events. The Dutch response? Not so much the widely touted building with nature, says Carbonell, but rather: engineering with nature.  Read the article…

Designing for water: the sweet & the salt of it

Designing for water: the sweet & the salt of it

Water is life – and death. As floods and droughts assume Biblical proportions in many areas in the world, the magnitude of the water issues we face is penetrating our awareness and our political and spatial agenda. Nowhere is that clearer than in the Netherlands, where mastery of the water has always been a condition for survival. If there is one element which is crucial to the Low Lands – for its sheer existence, for its landscape, for its identity – then that is water. The Dutch created land by pushing the water out with dikes and keeping it out with pumps. Now, however, the country that has refashioned its landscape so distinctly in order to keep water out, is letting it back in. For Landscape, the magazine of the British Landscape Institute, I wrote an essay based on my book in collaboration with Maartje van den Heuvel, Sweet&Salt: Water and the Dutch. Read the essay here: Tracy Metz – Designin for water: the sweet & the salt of it – 2012 – Landscape Institute

Read the article…

De recente geschiedenis volgens Mister Motley

De recente geschiedenis volgens Mister Motley

De recente geschiedenis van Nederland verteld door de kunst: dat is het thema van het nieuwe dubbeldikke nummer van het fijne eigenzinnige kunsttijdschrift Mister Motley. Daarin heb ik een artikel geschreven over de Watersnood van 1953. Het is door de redactie met vernuft en fantasie geïllustreerd met kunstwerken over water en watersnood. Trouwens, het hele nummer is een feest. Read the article…