Sweet&Salt in the Journal of Preservation Technology

Sweet&Salt in the Journal of Preservation Technology

The American publication Journal of Preservation Technology invited me to write about the changing Dutch approach to water management. “The Dutch have centuries of experience in keeping the water at bay. But will that suffice to protect the lowlands from the effects of climate change?” With examples from all around the country, from the Enclosure Dike up north to Rotterdam and down to Zeeland, and with some studies of future scenario’s – including managed retreat. Read my piece here:

Read the article…
Architectural Record: The canaries in the global warming-coalmine

Architectural Record: The canaries in the global warming-coalmine

In his review of Sweet&Salt: Water and the Dutch for the December print issue of Architectural Record, Bloomberg’s architecture critic James Russell describes the book as ”an intensely visual consideration of the history, culture and engineering of water that engages our senses and our emotions – not just our intellect – with its ravishing photography, cartography and art.” He is manifestly relieved that it is possible to talk about water issues and climate change without having to put on a hair shirt. Read his review here. Read the article…

Sweet&Salt:  Water Is Their Frenemy

Sweet&Salt: Water Is Their Frenemy

Sweeet&Salt: Water and the Dutch is ‘a beautiful and important book’, writes Armando Carbonell of the Lincoln Institute for Land Policy in his review of the book for the Loeb Fellowship site. ‘The ever-increasing Dutch reliance on engineering solutions to keep the water at bay does not come without costs, and they go beyond the never-ending building and maintenance of structures. There are increasing conflicts between the sweet and the salt, with serious worries about  fresh water for drinking and agriculture.’ And now comes the ‘hot breath of climate change’, with a higher sea level, bigger storm surges and more extreme rainfall events. The Dutch response? Not so much the widely touted building with nature, says Carbonell, but rather: engineering with nature.  Read the article…