Hong Kong’s hidden life: the city on the roofs

Hong Kong’s hidden life: the city on the roofs

Hong Kong: that is the world’s most densely populated city, an island of glistening skyscrapers, fashion and fast money, the most expensive real estate in the world against a backdrop of rugged mountains. Right? But the city also has a hidden life, on high and down below. Two fascinating books – as well as the ‘Homes for All’ video that Max Hirsh and Xiaoxuan Lu made for the digital magazine of my talkshow Stadsleven – shine a stark light on Hong Kong’s housing dilemma’s.

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Parket van een afgedankte barkruk, isolatie van oude jeans

Parket van een afgedankte barkruk, isolatie van oude jeans

Het nieuwe paviljoen van ABN Amro op de Zuidas heet ‘C i rc l’, maar het is niet rond. Het is hartstikke rechthoekig, met twee verdiepingen en een openbaar toegankelijke daktuin. Wat er wel rond aan is, is de gedachte erachter: dit moet een etalage worden voor circulair bouwen, de overtreffende trap van duurzaamheid. En de bank wil zelf het goede voorbeeld geven.

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Kaan Architecten transforms government building into workspace

Kaan Architecten transforms government building into workspace

Built in 1917 by the chief government architect Daniel E.C. Knuttel for the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture, Industry and Trade in The Hague, the brick and stone building at Bezuidenhoutseweg 30 has been transformed by the Rotterdam-based Kaan Architecten into a home for five government-related planning and advisory agencies. I wrote an article for Architectural Record about how the once dark and heavy interiors of this national landmark are now light and transparent, and, in keeping with the changing times, B30, named after its address, is ready to facilitate an exchange of knowledge rather than the exercise of power.

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Kaan Architecten transforms government building into workspace

Kaan Architecten transforms government building into workspace

Built in 1917 by the chief government architect Daniel E.C. Knuttel for the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture, Industry and Trade in The Hague, the brick and stone building at Bezuidenhoutseweg 30 has been transformed by the Rotterdam-based Kaan Architecten into a home for five government-related planning and advisory agencies. I wrote an article for Architectural Record about how the once dark and heavy interiors of this national landmark are now light and transparent, and, in keeping with the changing times, B30, named after its address, is ready to facilitate an exchange of knowledge rather than the exercise of power.

Read the article…